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San Bruno Groundwater Development Project

Project URL link
Sponsoring Agency City of San Bruno
Subregions ('West Bay',)
Counties San Mateo
Watershed Tributary
Public or private land? ()
Location (lat/lon) 37.63202,-122.42278
Start Date 2/1/2013
End Date 12/31/2016
Location Description The project will be in the City of San Bruno, which is located in Northern San Mateo County, in the “West Bay” sub-region as identified in the Bay Area IRWMP. The new municipal groundwater well and treatment system will be located on a City-owned parcel at the corner of Mariner Drive and Commodore Drive. The City overlies DWR Basin (2-35), the Westside Groundwater Basin.

This Project includes the development and use of groundwater as a new source of supply for the City of San Bruno through the design and construction of a new municipal groundwater supply well and treatment system.  It is anticipated that this project could deliver approximately 800 acre feet per year (AFY) of additional high-quality water supply to the City and allow the City to meet the terms of the Westside Basin Groundwater Storage and Recovery Project (GSR) Agreement, which provides drought benefits to the entire West Bay sub-region.

Implementation of this Project will provide the following benefits locally and regionally: (1) Immediate drought preparedness, (2) Increased local water supply reliability and the delivery of safe drinking water, (3) Groundwater management, (4) Improvement of water quality, (5) Drinking water treatment and distribution, and (6) Increased resilience to climate change.

Drinking Water Supply
Water Quality Improvement
Water Reuse/Recycling
Stormwater Improvements
Groundwater Benefits
Infiltration
Habitat Protection and Restoration
Flood Protection
DRINKING WATER SUPPLY: This project will add approximately 800 AFY of potable water to the City's water supply portfolio. This will increase and diversify the supply available to the City, including during droughts or other supply interruptions. This Project is also critical to the successful operation of the Westside Basin GSR Project, which is a critical drought relief project for the region. WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT: The treatment system that will be developed to treat the produced groundwater will ensure that the groundwater that enters the City's water distribution system meets all primary and secondary MCLs. GROUNDWATER BENEFITS: The City currently manages its surface and groundwater sources conjunctively, both locally and regionally as part of the South Westside Basin Groundwater Management Plan (GWMP) and the Westside Basin GSR Project. Development of this Project will assist the City to continue to do that in a cost-effective manner.

Part 2 - Detail

Objective

This Project will develop local groundwater resources for conjunctive use to increase public safety, diversify the City’s supply portfolio, provide drought relief, and increase supply reliability to the City and the region.  The City has one of the lowest residential per capita water uses in the State (48 R-GPCD), which makes drought cutbacks difficult to achieve. This Project will increase the City’s water supply by as much as 800 AFY, allow the City to contribute to the Westside Basin GSR Project, and make the City and region more resilient to drought cutbacks.

Description

This Project includes the design and construction of a new municipal groundwater supply well and treatment system.  This Project will deliver 800 AFY of treated water to the City. Implementation of this Project will diversify the City’s water portfolio, improve drinking water supply reliability, provide drought relief, and better allow the City to meet the health and safety needs of its water-efficient residents now and in the future, as well as benefit the region as part of its participation in the Westside Basin GSR Project.

Readiness to Proceed

The City initiated work on this Project in 2013. To date, the City has retained technical consulting assistance for the design and construction of the well and treatment system, acquired land, drilled a pilot hole to log stratigraphy, constructed a monitoring well, conducted water quality sampling, and completed a CEQA analysis.  The City is planning to issue bid documents for the well in Spring 2015, and will begin construction by Fall 2015. Following construction and testing of the well, the City will initiate design and construction of the treatment system, with Project completion anticipated in December 2016.

Function/Physical Benefit

 

The Project will produce 800 AFY of high-quality water for potable use. The Project will function as a lower cost, supplemental source of supply to the City which will aid the City to balance its use of surface water during normal and drought years, supply an additional source of water into the City’s distribution system to meet demands in three different pressure zones, increase the City’s resilience to supply disruption and climate change impacts, and ensure that the demands of the City’s customers can be reliably met. This Project will also increase the region’s drought reliability through the City’s participation in the Westside Basin GSR Project.

Coordination/Collaboration

The City is committed to continuing to work with stakeholders in the Westside Basin and the region to effectively manage the basin, including the development and implementation of management and monitoring programs in conformance with current State laws and local agreements, including those for the implementation of the 2012 South Westside Basin GWMP, the Westside Basin GSR Project, and future actions to be taken in response to the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act.  Specifically, the entities that the City has been coordinating with include: the Bay Area Water Supply and Conservation Agency (BAWSCA); San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC); Daly City; South San Francisco; and other stakeholders.
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LOCAL DROUGHT RELIEF AND WATER SUPPLY NEED: Currently the City’s customers use approximately 48 R-GPCD, which means that during a significant drought and cutbacks to its surface water supply, they have limited ability to reduce their consumption.  The construction of this well will provide the City with a supplemental source of supply which will create a buffer for the City during droughts, such as the one that we are currently experiencing. Further, since the City will have an alternative supply that it can rely on during normal and drought years, this Project will reduce the City’s reliance on surface water, which benefits the region and the Delta, and increase the City’s resilience in the face of climate change. REGIONAL DROUGHT RELIEF NEED: The City is a participant in the Westside Basin GSR Project, which is a 7.4 MGD drought-relief project that increases the supply reliability for the entire Hetch-Hetchy system, including for all the BAWSCA agencies.  The GSR Agreement requires the City to pump 3,350 AFY at an average rate of 2.1 GPM during dry years in order to provide drought benefit to the region (i.e., when SFPUC declares a drought, the City is required to use groundwater in lieu of taking surface water from the Hetch-Hetchy system, which then frees up surface water for other system users). Without this Project, the City will not have the capacity to produce sufficient groundwater, which will impact the drought reliability of the region. WATER SYSTEM RELIABILITY NEED: As was evidenced during the 2009 explosion of the PG&E gas pipeline in the City, which shut-down water service to a portion of the City, and the recent water quality incident on the Hetch-Hetchy system wherein untreated water was delivered to many utilities in the region, the City will benefit from a supplemental source of supply that can act as an additional source of supply during an emergency or other supply interruption from the Hetch-Hetchy system.  This Project will provide highly-treated water to multiple pressure zones within the City, greatly increasing operational flexibility and system redundancy and reliability. WATER QUALITY NEED: Groundwater produced from the Westside Basin tends to have elevated levels of iron and manganese. Therefore, in order to deliver groundwater to its customers for potable use, the City will have to design, construct and operate a treatment system. ECONOMIC NEED: Currently the cost to purchase water from the Hetch-Hetchy system is approximately $1,900 per acre-foot. In contrast, groundwater from this Project will cost approximately $400 per acre-foot to produce, achieving a much more cost-effective water supply solution for the City. Over 20 years, this Project will save the City $24,000,000. Furthermore, without this Project and the ability to conjunctively use groundwater locally and as part of the Westside Basin GSR Project, the City and the region will suffer significant economic impacts during drought.

Local Water Supply / Drought Relief Impact

If this Project is not implemented the City will remain vulnerable to drought, which will have significant economic and other impacts.  The City will also be vulnerable to supply interruptions or water quality breaches on the Hetch-Hetchy system.

Regional Drought Impact

Without this Project, the City will not have the capacity to produce the amount of groundwater that it is required to do under the Westside Basin GSR Project Agreement, which will impact the drought reliability of the region and have a major economic impact.

Economic Impact

The City will be negatively impacted economically as the cost to purchase water from the Hetch-Hetchy system is significantly more expensive than the cost to produce groundwater (i.e., currently the cost to purchase water from the Hetch-Hetchy system is approximately $1,900 per acre-foot, while groundwater costs approximately $400 per acre-foot to produce). Over 20 years, this Project will save the City $24,000,000. Further, to the extent that the Westside Basin GSR Project is not able to effectively function due to the City’s lack of production capacity, there will be significant economic impacts to the region.

By adding an additional, local and drought-proof supply source, this Project immediately achieves the following benefits locally (and by extension to the region) that are consistent with State and regional priorities:

Immediate Drought Preparedness

 This Project increases the City’s water supply portfolio by 800 AFY to include a more drought-proof groundwater source that will benefit the City’s customers that currently use 48 R-GPCD. Further, this Project ensures that the City can meet the terms of its Westside Basin GSR Agreement, which requires the City to pump 3,350 AFY at an average rate of 2.1 GPM during dry years in order to provide drought benefit to the region (i.e., when SFPUC declares a drought, the City is required to groundwater in lieu of taking surface water from the Hetch-Hetchy system, which then frees up surface water for other users of the Hetch-hetchy system).

Increases local water supply reliability and the delivery of safe drinking water

This Project adds 800 AFY of treated groundwater to the City’s available supplies.

Groundwater Management

Through the implementation of the South Westside Basin GWMP and the Westside Basin GSR Project, the City continues to work with other basin users to manage the Westside Basin and to provide drought benefits locally and to the region.

Improvement of Water Quality

By adding a groundwater treatment system, the City will be able to tap into an underutilized resource and distribute high-quality water to its customers.

Drinking water treatment and distribution

By adding wellhead treatment, the City will have access to 800 AFY of treated groundwater that meets all MCLs that can be served within three pressure zones within the City.

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Increases Water Supply Reliability
Advances/ Expands Conjunctive Management of Multiple Water Supply Sources
Increases Water Use and/or Reuse Efficiency
Provides Additional Water Supply
Promotes Water Quality Protection
Reduces Water Demand
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Addresses Sea Level Rise
Addresses other Anticipated Climate Change Impact (e.g. through water management system modifications)
Improves Flood Control (e.g. through wetlands restoration, management, protection)
Promotes Habitat Protection
Establishes Migration Corridors
Re-establishes River-Floodplain Hydrologic Continuity
Re-introduces Anadromous Fish Populations to Upper Watersheds
Enhances and Protects Upper Watershed Forests and Meadow Systems
Other (Please Describe)
Increases Water Use Efficiency or Promotes Energy-Efficient Water Demand Reduction
Improves Water System Energy Efficiency
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Promotes Use of Renewable Energy Sources
Contributes to Carbon Sequestration (e.g. through vegetation growth)
Other (Please Describe)
(low) - (high)
Drought Preparedness
Use and Reuse Water More Efficiently
Climate Change Response Actions (Adaptation to Climate Change, Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reduce Energy Consumption)
Expand Environmental Stewardship
Practice Integrated Flood Management
Protect Surface and Groundwater Quality
Improve Tribal Water and Natural Resources
Ensure Equitable Distribution of Benefits
Reduce Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Reduce Water Demand
Improved Operational Efficiency and Transfers
Increase Water Supply
Improve Water Quality
Improve Flood Management
Practice Resources Stewardship
Other Strategies (Please Describe)
Groundwater Management Plan
Urban Water Management Plan
Water Meter Requirements
Groundwater Monitoring Requirements
AB 1420 Compliance
BMP Compliance
CEQA Compliance
Water supply reliability, water conservation and water use efficiency
Stormwater capture, storage, clean-up, treatment, and management
Removal of invasive non-native species, the creation and enhancement of wetlands, and the acquisition, protection, and restoration of open space and watershed lands
Non-point source pollution reduction, management and monitoring
Groundwater recharge and management projects
Contaminant and salt removal through reclamation, desalting, and other treatment technologies and conveyance of reclaimed water for distribution to users
Water banking, exchange, reclamation and improvement of water quality
Planning and implementation of multipurpose flood management programs
Watershed protection and management
Drinking water treatment and distribution
Ecosystem and fisheries restoration and protection
Reduced Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Projects that directly address a critical water quality or supply issue in a DAC
Urban water suppliers implementing certain BMPs as on page 17 of Guidelines
Be designed to manage stormwater runoff to reduce flood damage (PRC §5096.827)
Be consistent with the applicable Regional Water Quality Control Plans (Basin Plans) (PRC §5096.827)
Not be a part of the State Plan of Flood Control (SPFC) (PRC §5096.827)

Project team

Part 3 - Benefits