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East Bayshore Recycled Water Project Phase 1B - Oakland-Alameda Estuary Crossing

Project URL link
Sponsoring Agency EBMUD
Subregions ('East Bay',)
Counties Alameda
Watershed Tributary ??
Public or private land? ('Public',)
Location (lat/lon)
Start Date 6/1/2014
End Date 6/1/2017
Location Description Eastern San Francisco at EBMUD's main wastewater treatment plant, and near the 880/980 Interchange crossing the Alameda Estuary.

The East Bayhsore Recycled Water Project, a multi-phase project, will provide up to 2.5 mgd of recycled water to customers within the cities of Alameda, Albany, Berkeley, Emeryville, and Oakland. Phase 1A of the project provides 0.5 mgd while Phase 1B Estuary Crossing will eventually provide an additional 1.2 mgd as the first segment of the Phase 1B project. This includes about 1.5 miles of 20-inch and 16-inch transmission and distribution pipelines.

The East Bayhsore Recycled Water Project, a multi-phase project, will provide up to 2.5 mgd of recycled water to customers within the cities of Alameda, Albany, Berkeley, Emeryville, and Oakland.  Phase 1A of the project provides 0.5 mgd while Phase 1B Estuary Crossing will eventually provide an additional 1.2 mgd as the first segment of the Phase 1B project.  This includes about 1.5 miles of 20-inch and 16-inch transmission and distribution pipelines.  
2017
Drinking Water Supply
Water Quality Improvement
Water Reuse/Recycling
Stormwater Improvements
Groundwater Benefits
Infiltration
Habitat Protection and Restoration
Flood Protection
The project supplies recycled water for use in place of drinking water. It reuses treated wastewater that must otherwise be discharged into the San Francisco Bay, thereby helping to realize Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for San Francisco Bay. The project preserves the limited drinking water supply that could be used to replenish groundwater aquifer; provides recycled water for wetlands restoration; provides supplies and improved practices in landscape irrigation helping to reduce stormwater runoff and improve stormwater quality ; reduces deliveries from Mokelumne River which will result in larger reservoir storage capacities for managing flows and regulating releases during high river flow flood seasons; supplies recycled water for landscape irrigation in the disadventaged community of West Oakland.
This project addresses long-term drought preparedness by contributing to sustainable water supply and reliabiltiy. Recycled water produced and supplied by this project will be used instead of potable water for non-potable uses that are currently served by EBMUD's supplies from the Mokelumne River. During dry and critical dry years, the project will help to offsett demands for potable water.
This project effectively integrates water managememant with land use planning by addressing future demand as a result of land use and growth. Future demands are porjected using trends developed by compiling, evaluating and analyzing ecomonic, demographic, and real estate data; reviewing general plan documents, zoning maps, and information obtatined from meetings with local planning agencies.
Additional partnerships with local municipal agencies such as public works and planning agencies to address outdoors use and demand that could lead to improving stormwater runoff.
No
Yes

Part 2 - Detail

The EBRWP Phase 1A, currently under construction will provide 0.5 mgd to a variety of customers.  Phase 1B will eventually provide an additional 1.2 mgd by expanding recycled water transmission and distribution pipelines and tertiary treatment facilities.  The specific components of the proposed Phase 1B Estuary Crossing include constructing 3,600 feet of 20-inch pipeline in Oakland and 2,300 feet of 16-inch transmission pipeline to cross under the Oakland-Alameda Estuary to deliver recycled water to Alameda.

The recycled water provided by the Phase 1B Estuary Crossing may be used for irrigation, industrial uses, toilet flushing in commercial buildings, and wetlands restoration.  This project proposes to use recycled water to supply customers in the city of Alameda, to restore wetlands along the Lake Merritt Channel in Oakland, which would enhance the connection between Lake Merritt, the channel, and Oakland Estuary, and improve aquatic habitat and enhance the park on the south side of the lake. 
True
East Bayshore Recycled Water Project. This is the second phase of the project's four (4) phases; EBMUD's Regional Water Supply Management Program 2040.

 

    • San Francisco Bay
    • Local and upcountry watersheds
    • Bayside groundwater basin
The EBRWP multi-phased project, when completed will provide 2.5 mgd of recycled water, includes a tertiary treatment plan, transmission and distribution pipelines, and customer retrofits.  The first phase has been completed in the Oakland area that began recycled water deliveries in 2008 to portions of Oakland and Emeryville.  The remainder of Phase 1A project in northern Emeryville, Berkeley, and Albany has not been completed and would provide 0.5 mgd.  The proposed Phase 1B - Oakland will provide additional 1.2 mgd by expanding recycled water transmission and distribution systems.  The proposed work includes adding about 3,600 feet of 20-inch pipeline in Oakland and about 2,300 feet of 16-inch pipeline to cross under the Oakland - Alameda Estuary to deliver recycled water to Alameda.  The recycled water provided by the Phase 1B - Oakland may be used for irrigation, industrial uses, toilet flushing in commercial building, and wetlands restoration.  This project proposes to use recycled water for wetlands restoration along Lake Merritt Channel in Oakland, whioch would enhance the connection between Lake Merritt, the channel, and Oakland Estuary, and improve aquatic habitat and enhance the park on the south side of the lake while preserving the limited potable water supplies.
If the proposed project is not implemented, the EBRWP will not be oprated at the design capacity while wasting the limited drinking water.  Benefits such as increasing regional reliance and flood control reducing drinking water supply, restoring wetlands may not be fully realized while limtied drinking supply continued to be used for non-potable uses.

i. Water Supply (conservation, recycled water, groundwater recharge, surface storage, etc.)

 

ii. Water Quality

 

iii. Flood and Stormwater Management

 

iv. Resource Stewardship (watershed management, habitat protection and restoration, recreation, open space, etc.)

 

 
The funding will cover a portion of one of EBMUD's Integratate Recycled Water Management Project (IRWMP) components.  The IRWMP will enhance EBMUD's ability to meet the needs of its 1.34 million business and residential customers by providing a reliable alternative recycled water supply that will conserve high quality potable water supplies.  The projects that comprise the IRWMP will supply up to 8 mgd of highly purified recycled water to portions of EBMUD's extensive service area except the San Ramon Valley whis is already served by a recycled water porject which benefits from some federal funding.  This project will help to offset demands for potable water by substituting recycled water for beneficial landscape, commercial and industrial water uses currently served by EBMUD's supplies from the Mokelumne Reiver, which is a tributary to the Delta.  During dry and critically dry years, the project will reduce EBMUD deversions from the Mokelumne and/or Sacramento Rivers.  By increasing the proportion of recycled water used, EBMUD will be able to save a larger percentage of its high quality potable water supplies for residential and commercial potable uses, thereby, increasing regional supply reliability.  The project reduces wastewater discharges to San Francisco Bay by resuding wastewater that would otherwise be discharged to the San Francisco Bay from EBMUD's main wastewater treatment plant.  The project will reduce the amount of water that must otherwise by delivered from the Mokelumne River to EBMUD's service area.  Reducing deliveries can result in higher reservoir storage levels in EBMUD reservoirs in the Sierra Nevada foothills and increased reservoir releases to the lower Mokelumne River.  Once that water reaches the Delta, it provides additional benefits for Delta resources and water users.
True
True
True
Increases Water Supply Reliability
Advances/ Expands Conjunctive Management of Multiple Water Supply Sources
Increases Water Use and/or Reuse Efficiency
Provides Additional Water Supply
Promotes Water Quality Protection
Reduces Water Demand
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Addresses Sea Level Rise
Addresses other Anticipated Climate Change Impact (e.g. through water management system modifications)
Improves Flood Control (e.g. through wetlands restoration, management, protection)
Promotes Habitat Protection
Establishes Migration Corridors
Re-establishes River-Floodplain Hydrologic Continuity
Re-introduces Anadromous Fish Populations to Upper Watersheds
Enhances and Protects Upper Watershed Forests and Meadow Systems
Other (Please Describe)
Increases Water Use Efficiency or Promotes Energy-Efficient Water Demand Reduction
Improves Water System Energy Efficiency
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Promotes Use of Renewable Energy Sources
Contributes to Carbon Sequestration (e.g. through vegetation growth)
Other (Please Describe)
$7,000,000(low) - $7,500,000(high)
EBMUD, USACE
(new easements may not be needed)
TBD
Revenue/general fund (EBMUD)
30 - 40 years
Drought Preparedness
Use and Reuse Water More Efficiently
Climate Change Response Actions (Adaptation to Climate Change, Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reduce Energy Consumption)
Expand Environmental Stewardship
Practice Integrated Flood Management
Protect Surface and Groundwater Quality
Improve Tribal Water and Natural Resources
Ensure Equitable Distribution of Benefits
Reduce Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Reduce Water Demand
Improved Operational Efficiency and Transfers
Increase Water Supply
Improve Water Quality
Improve Flood Management
Practice Resources Stewardship
Other Strategies (Please Describe)
Groundwater Management Plan
Urban Water Management Plan
Water Meter Requirements
Groundwater Monitoring Requirements
AB 1420 Compliance
BMP Compliance
CEQA Compliance
Water supply reliability, water conservation and water use efficiency
Stormwater capture, storage, clean-up, treatment, and management
Removal of invasive non-native species, the creation and enhancement of wetlands, and the acquisition, protection, and restoration of open space and watershed lands
Non-point source pollution reduction, management and monitoring
Groundwater recharge and management projects
Contaminant and salt removal through reclamation, desalting, and other treatment technologies and conveyance of reclaimed water for distribution to users
Water banking, exchange, reclamation and improvement of water quality
Planning and implementation of multipurpose flood management programs
Watershed protection and management
Drinking water treatment and distribution
Ecosystem and fisheries restoration and protection
Reduced Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Projects that directly address a critical water quality or supply issue in a DAC
Urban water suppliers implementing certain BMPs as on page 17 of Guidelines
Be designed to manage stormwater runoff to reduce flood damage (PRC §5096.827)
Be consistent with the applicable Regional Water Quality Control Plans (Basin Plans) (PRC §5096.827)
Not be a part of the State Plan of Flood Control (SPFC) (PRC §5096.827)
Water Supply Management Reduce regional dependence on imported water supplies by reducing water demand: using recycled water, instead of potable water, for beneficial landscape, commercial and industrial uses  
Increase regional supply reliability by reducing the risk of severe rationing during prolonged droughts  
Water Quality Management Reduce discharges of treated wastewater to San Francisco Bay  
Help realize Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for San Francisco Bay  
   
Ecosystem Management Increase flows through the Delta by reducing water supply that comes from the Mokelumne River  
Increase Mokelumne River instream flows for environmental uses  
Improve flood management by reduce demand from the Mokelumne River  
Practice resources stewardship by reducing demand and discharge on the Delta and San Francisco Bay, respectively  

Project team

Part 3 - Benefits

East Bayshore Recycled Water Project Phase 1B Oakland Alameda Estuary Crossing.xls — Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, 233Kb