Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home Projects Corte Madera Creek Watershed Infiltration and Storage Assessment
Document Actions

Corte Madera Creek Watershed Infiltration and Storage Assessment

Project URL link
Sponsoring Agency Ross Valley Watershed Program, Friends of Corte Madera Creek Watershed
Subregions ('North Bay',)
Counties Marin
Watershed Tributary Corte Madera Creek
Public or private land? ('Public', 'Private')
Location (lat/lon)
Start Date When funding is available.
End Date Start date plus 5 years
Location Description Corte Madera Creek Watershed - 28 square miles in eastern Marin County

This project would develop an inventory of impervious surfaces in the Ross Valley, identify areas with suitable soil depth and characteristics to make increased infiltration a feasible alternative, and develop stategies and demonstration projects to replace impervious surfaces with pervious. This project would at the same time investigate the feasibility of diverting runoff into on-site temporary storage facilities (swales, sumps, cisterns, detention basins, temporarily flooded park lands) from which it could be released after the peak flow has occurred or stored for irrigation in dry summer months.

This project would develop an inventory of impervious surfaces, identify areas with suitable soil depth and characteristics to make increased infiltration a feasible alternative, and develop stategies and demonstration projects to replace impervious surfaces with pervious. This project would at the same time investigate the feasibility of diverting runoff into on-site temporary storage facilities (swales, sumps, cisterns, detention basins, temporarily flooded park lands) from which it could be released after the peak flow has occurred or stored for irrigation in dry summer months. The project would determine the physical and cost-benefit feasibilty of achieving flood management and water conservation objectives with a combination of infiltration and detention strategies. Increased infiltration would likely increase summer stream flows, benefitting steelhead trout. other aquatic organisms, and riparian plant and animal species.

None
Drinking Water Supply
Water Quality Improvement
Water Reuse/Recycling
Stormwater Improvements
Groundwater Benefits
Infiltration
Habitat Protection and Restoration
Flood Protection
Water quality in creeks would be improved by filtering stormwater through soil or storing it for use as irrigation water. Stormwater would be managed more effectively. Infiltration would be increased, which would likely increase summer streamflow thereby benefitting aquatic and riparian habitats. Reducing impervious surfaces and/or storing the run-off from the impervious surfaces would reduce the risk of flooding.
Promoting Low-Impact Design (LID) is an important component of Marin County's land use planning. This project would provide a way to retroactively implement LID projects, improving water management in areas that are already developed.
This is a multi-benefit project. During implementation of the project, partners would be identified.
See above.
Flood management, Groundwater management, Land use planning, NPS pollution control, Storm water capture and management, Water conservation, Water quality protection and improvement
Watershed Management-Habitat Protection & Restoration

Part 2 - Detail

This project would develop an inventory of impervious surfaces using aerial photo interpretation and existing Marin County Department of Public works assessments of impervious surfaces. The inventory would characterize impervious surfaces with sufficient detail to identify those, such as parking lots, that might be repaved; surfaces where runoff could be diverted to swales or infiltration features; locations where runoff from structures might be stored for summer irrigation; and other characteristics that would inform design details. 

Then, soils would be studied to identify areas with suitable soil depth and characteristics to make increased infiltration a feasible alternative, and develop stategies and demonstration projects to replace impervious surfaces with pervious. This project would at the same time investigate the feasibility of diverting runoff into on-site temporary storage facilities (swales, sumps, cisterns, detention basins, temporarily flooded park lands) from which it could be released after the peak flow has occurred or stored for irrigation in dry summer months. 

The project would determine the physical and cost-benefit feasibilty of achieving flood management and water conservation objectives with a combination of infiltration and detention strategies. Increased infiltration would likely increase summer stream flows, benefitting steelhead trout. other aquatic organisms, and riparian plant and animal species.

True
Ross Valley Watershed Program is a watershed-wide plan to enhance habitat and reduce flood risk. It includes detention and infiltration as potential components.

Corte Madera Creek and its tributaries: Fairfax Creek, Deer Park Creek, San Anselmo Creek, Sleepy Hollow Creek, Ross Creek, Tamalpais Creek, and Larkspur Creek.

The Ross Valley is prone to flooding. Detailed modeling conducted as part of the Ross Valley Watershed Program show that with some large detention basins and a number of in-stream measures to increase channel capacity (e.g., new bridges, selective widening of the channel, restoring flood plains), it may be possible to provide 100-year level of protection to communities in the watershed. Achieving this level of protection would be more likely if a number of small detention and infiltration projects could reduce peak flows.  Additional benefits of implementing this project would be increased infiltration to supplement summer stream flows, enhancing summer rearing habitat for steelhead trout and other aquatic and riparian plants and animals. Stormwater infiltrated into the ground would be cleaned as it passes through soil. Run-off captured from roofs and stored for irrigation would reduce the need for domestic water. 

i. Water Supply (conservation, recycled water, groundwater recharge, surface storage, etc.)

...

ii. Water Quality

...

iii. Flood and Stormwater Management

...

iv. Resource Stewardship (watershed management, habitat protection and restoration, recreation, open space, etc.)

...

False
False
False
Increases Water Supply Reliability
Advances/ Expands Conjunctive Management of Multiple Water Supply Sources
Increases Water Use and/or Reuse Efficiency
Provides Additional Water Supply
Promotes Water Quality Protection
Reduces Water Demand
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Addresses Sea Level Rise
Addresses other Anticipated Climate Change Impact (e.g. through water management system modifications)
Improves Flood Control (e.g. through wetlands restoration, management, protection)
Promotes Habitat Protection
Establishes Migration Corridors
Re-establishes River-Floodplain Hydrologic Continuity
Re-introduces Anadromous Fish Populations to Upper Watersheds
Enhances and Protects Upper Watershed Forests and Meadow Systems
Other (Please Describe)
Increases Water Use Efficiency or Promotes Energy-Efficient Water Demand Reduction
Improves Water System Energy Efficiency
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Promotes Use of Renewable Energy Sources
Contributes to Carbon Sequestration (e.g. through vegetation growth)
Other (Please Describe)
(low) - (high)
Drought Preparedness
Use and Reuse Water More Efficiently
Climate Change Response Actions (Adaptation to Climate Change, Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reduce Energy Consumption)
Expand Environmental Stewardship
Practice Integrated Flood Management
Protect Surface and Groundwater Quality
Improve Tribal Water and Natural Resources
Ensure Equitable Distribution of Benefits
Reduce Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Reduce Water Demand
Improved Operational Efficiency and Transfers
Increase Water Supply
Improve Water Quality
Improve Flood Management
Practice Resources Stewardship
Other Strategies (Please Describe)
Groundwater Management Plan
Urban Water Management Plan
Water Meter Requirements
Groundwater Monitoring Requirements
AB 1420 Compliance
BMP Compliance
CEQA Compliance
Water supply reliability, water conservation and water use efficiency
Stormwater capture, storage, clean-up, treatment, and management
Removal of invasive non-native species, the creation and enhancement of wetlands, and the acquisition, protection, and restoration of open space and watershed lands
Non-point source pollution reduction, management and monitoring
Groundwater recharge and management projects
Contaminant and salt removal through reclamation, desalting, and other treatment technologies and conveyance of reclaimed water for distribution to users
Water banking, exchange, reclamation and improvement of water quality
Planning and implementation of multipurpose flood management programs
Watershed protection and management
Drinking water treatment and distribution
Ecosystem and fisheries restoration and protection
Reduced Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Projects that directly address a critical water quality or supply issue in a DAC
Urban water suppliers implementing certain BMPs as on page 17 of Guidelines
Be designed to manage stormwater runoff to reduce flood damage (PRC §5096.827)
Be consistent with the applicable Regional Water Quality Control Plans (Basin Plans) (PRC §5096.827)
Not be a part of the State Plan of Flood Control (SPFC) (PRC §5096.827)

Project team

Part 3 - Benefits