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Breuner Marsh Restoration, Richmond

Project URL link
Sponsoring Agency East Bay Regional Park District
Subregions ('East Bay',)
Counties Contra Costa
Watershed Tributary Rheem Creek
Public or private land? ('Public',)
Location (lat/lon) 37.98276, -122.34877
Start Date 8/1/12
End Date 12/31/16
Location Description Breuner Marsh is accessed via Goodrick Avenue from the Richmond Parkway.
Breuner Marsh Restoration, Richmond

East Bay Regional Park District proposes to create, restore, enhance and protect 150 acres of crucial habitat in Breuner Marsh at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline Park in the City of Richmond on the San Francisco Bay shoreline, Contra Costa County, California. The goal of this wetland restoration project is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie to create valuable habitat for special status species and for public access for compatible passive recreation and public education.

East Bay Regional Park District proposes to create, restore, enhance and protect 150 acres of crucial habitat in Breuner Marsh at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline Park in the City of Richmond on the San Francisco Bay shoreline, Contra Costa County, California. The goal of this wetland restoration project is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie to create valuable habitat for special status species and for public access for compatible passive recreation and public education.

12/31/16
Drinking Water Supply
Water Quality Improvement
Water Reuse/Recycling
Stormwater Improvements
Groundwater Benefits
Infiltration
Habitat Protection and Restoration
Flood Protection
Water Quality Improvements - Creates tidal and seasonal wetlands, remediates toxics, filters run off. Infiltration - re-establish the natural marsh plain and breaches dikes and former salt ponds. Habitat Protection and Restoration - creates tidal and seasonal wetlands, restores coastal prairie and improves habitat for small mammals and birds Flood Protection - transitional zone future tidal marsh as sea level rises, new channels to connect wetlands to the Bay Related to Disadvantaged Community - Water resource related recreation for neighborhoods of Parchester Village, Bayview-Montalvin, Tara Hills, Rollingwood and the Iron Triangle in Richmond.
No applicable
The property was targeted for shoreline development. The East Bay Regional Park District used eminent domain powers to acquire the property with the goal of creating a wetland complex that contains an estimated 540 acres of tidal marsh and more than 900 acres of tidal flat.
Subtidal Habitat Goals, Bay Goals, BCDC Bay Plan policies on climaite change/sea level rise.
Through its $125 million WW Local Grant Program the East Bay Regional Park District can provide funding to Cities, Alameda and Contra Costa County and Regional Park District's for open space and resource projects.
The goal of this wetland restoration project is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie

Part 2 - Detail

East Bay Regional Park District proposes to create, restore, enhance and protect 150 acres of crucial habitat in Breuner Marsh at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline Park in the northwest part of the City of Richmond on the San Francisco Bay shoreline, Contra Costa County, California. The goal of this wetland restoration project is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie to create valuable habitat for special status species and for public access for compatible passive recreation and public education.

The project will provide and enhance approximately 60 acres of wetlands and 90 acres of coastal prairie will be restored or enhanced. Wetlands restoration will aid in reducing polluted run-off from surrounding urban industrial areas by providing a natural filtering system of marshland vegetation. Due to the combination of wetlands and upland areas, the project will provide a transitional area to mitigate the effects of extreme high-tide events caused by sea level rise due to climate change. To aid in public education regarding the fragile marsh habitat, public access improvements will include interpretive exhibits and provide for new naturalist-lead tours of the restored marsh and promote public health by increasing outdoor recreational opportunities for the adjacent under-served community of primarily low-income and minority residents.

 

False

Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Report Recommendations http://www.sfei.org/node/2123/

Restoring the Estuary: the Implementation Strategy for the San Francisco Bay on Joint Venture http://www.sfbayjv.org/strategy.php

San Francisco Estuary Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan http://www.sfei.org/CCMPPhase6

California State Coastal Conservancy Strategic Plan 2007 http://scc.ca.gov/strategic-plan-2007/

Castro Cove / Chevron Richmond Refinery Draft Damage Assessment and Restoration Plan / Environmental Assessment http://bit.ly/PlgTBh

Plan/Goal: San Francisco Bay Basin (Region 2) Water Quality Control Plan, by California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/sanfranciscobay/basin_planning.shtml

The Rheem Creek Watershed Assessment and Conceptual Restoration Plan was prepared by the Natural Heritage Institute in March 2007 and was funded by the CALFED Watershed Program http://www.n-h-i.org/uploads/tx_rtgfiles/7734_RheemWA.pdf

 

San Francisco Bay, Rheem Creek Watershed, San Pablo Creek Watershed, Wildcat Creek Watershed

The goal of this wetland restoration project is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie to create valuable habitat for special status species and for public access for passive recreation and public education. It provides water resource related recreational opportunities to lower income residents in Richmond. It is adjacent to the high density underserved neighborhoods of Parchester Village, Bayview-Montalvin, Tara Hills, Rollingwood and the Iron Triangle in Richmond. Much of Richmond’s historic shoreline has been lost to industrial uses and is no longer accessible to the public. Marshes have been filled, invaded by non-native species, polluted and fragmented. However, the seven-mile stretch of shoreline from Point San Pablo to Point Pinole represents one of the last remaining shorelines still largely intact. This wetland complex contains an estimated 540 acres of tidal marsh and more than 900 acres of tidal flat. Lying just offshore is the largest eelgrass bed in the entire San Francisco Bay, all of which helps to support a diverse population of waterbirds, fish and other wildlife. A broad tidal flat once bordered most of this portion of San Pablo Bay. A string of small tidal marshes existed in coves along this shoreline at the mouths of several creeks. A large tidal marsh spanned much of the area between the San Pablo Peninsula and Point Pinole, with extensive areas of moist grasslands bordering on the upland edge. Today, the area contains considerable industrial development. Much of the historic tidal marshes and wetlands have been filled for heavy industrial uses and landfills. The proposed project will occur at one of the few tidal marshes remaining in the area.  

Existing wetland areas would be enhanced by excavating new channels to connect them to the Bay and allow tidal flooding. Material removed from wetland areas would be used to build upland areas with gentle slopes and to create broad transitional zone habitat. The transitional zone would become a future tidal marsh as sea level rises in line with predictions.

The goal is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie to create valuable habitat for special status species, and for public access for compatible, passive recreation and public education. Restoration and enhancement of Breuner Marsh will increase natural habitat values of the site for marine, intertidal, and upland species.

Restoration and enhancement at Breuner Marsh will focus on developing self-sustaining ecological habitats with a minimal amount of long-term human intervention. Public access will focus on developing recreational facilities that are compatible with restored habitats and that require a minimum level of maintenance.

Restoration of this former marsh allows for expansion of subtidal-to-wetland-to-upland transitional areas that are present at only a few East Bay locations. This property provides an especially important opportunity to maintain viable habitats in the face of anticipated sea level rise. Enhancing existing seasonal wetlands and creating new seasonal wetlands will provide greater connectivity with other habitats. Enhancement and creation of new coastal prairie and upland buffer will increase the value of transitional areas between ecological habitats. Benefits of these restoration efforts include establishing protected cover and shorebird foraging areas, as well as roosting, nesting and brooding sites. Special status species that will benefit from this project include salt marsh harvest mouse, California clapper rail, and California black rail, all of which are present in the project area.

Creating, restoring and enhancing tidal marsh and seasonal wetlands at Breuner Marsh will greatly improve ecological conditions for wetland dependent species at this location on San Pablo Bay. Improved habitat for small mammals and birds, such as salt marsh harvest mouse, California clapper rail and California black rail, will aid in the recovery of these species. Re-establishing a wetland corridor between Wildcat/San Pablo Creek marshes and Breuner/Giant Marsh will link these existing habitat areas, increase wetland acreage, and reduce isolation of plant and animal populations.

 

i. Water Supply (conservation, recycled water, groundwater recharge, surface storage, etc.)

The shallow zone groundwater was considered as a possible source for irrigation water, but the pH levels and salinity make it very marginal to unusable. The deeper aquifer is considerably more saline, with TDS levels reported to be in the range of 4,100 milligrams per liter (mg/l) to as much as 9,400 mg/l. The State Water Resources Control Board considers that water with TDS levels exceeding 3,000 mg/l are not reasonably expected to be a public water supply (SWRCB Resolution 88-63). Based on pH levels and salinity, neither aquifer is considered to be a source of drinking water or irrigation water supply.

 

ii. Water Quality

Much of Richmond's historic shoreline has been lost to industrial uses and is a point source of pollution in the bay. Marshes have been filled, fragmented, polluted and invaded by non-native species. However, the seven-mile stretch of shoreline from Point San Pablo to Point Pinole represents one of the last remaining shorelines still largely intact. The goal of this wetland restoration project is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie that will provide and enhance valuable habitat. Wetlands restoration will aid in reducing polluted run-off from surrounding urban industrial areas by providing a natural filtering system of marshland vegetation.

 

iii. Flood and Stormwater Management

Due to the combination of wetlands and upland areas, the project will provide a transitional area to mitigate the effects of extreme high-tide events caused by sea level rise due to climate change. The high-tide marsh zone, once kilometers deep, is now an interrupted band, averaging approximately 2 meters deep, due to diking, fill and urban development. Extreme high tide events, exacerbated by increased numbers of severe storms, and expected sea level rise due to climate change, cause catastrophic flooding of marshes.

 

iv. Resource Stewardship (watershed management, habitat protection and restoration, recreation, open space, etc.)

The restoration plan will focus on establishing proper elevations and soil balance through a grading plan. The approach will not attempt to “engineer” a pre-determined tidal marsh, but will provide a setting for the natural evolution of wetland functions (including sea-level rise) and interplay of natural ecologic processes to restore the preexisting marsh. The goal is to provide long-term, self-sustaining tidal wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and coastal prairie to create valuable habitat for special status species, and for public access for compatible, passive recreation and public education. Restoration and enhancement of Breuner Marsh will increase natural habitat values of the site for marine, intertidal, and upland species. It provides water resource related recreational opportunities to lower income residents in Richmond. It is adjacent to the high density underserved neighborhoods of Parchester Village, Bayview-Montalvin, Tara Hills, Rollingwood and the Iron Triangle in Richmond.

False
True
True
Increases Water Supply Reliability
Advances/ Expands Conjunctive Management of Multiple Water Supply Sources
Increases Water Use and/or Reuse Efficiency
Provides Additional Water Supply
Promotes Water Quality Protection
Reduces Water Demand
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Addresses Sea Level Rise
Addresses other Anticipated Climate Change Impact (e.g. through water management system modifications)
Improves Flood Control (e.g. through wetlands restoration, management, protection)
Promotes Habitat Protection
Establishes Migration Corridors
Re-establishes River-Floodplain Hydrologic Continuity
Re-introduces Anadromous Fish Populations to Upper Watersheds
Enhances and Protects Upper Watershed Forests and Meadow Systems
Other (Please Describe)
Increases Water Use Efficiency or Promotes Energy-Efficient Water Demand Reduction
Improves Water System Energy Efficiency
Advances/Expands Water Recycling
Promotes Urban Runoff Reuse
Promotes Use of Renewable Energy Sources
Contributes to Carbon Sequestration (e.g. through vegetation growth)
Other (Please Describe)
7000000(low) - 9000000(high)
USFWS, Castro Cove Trustees, EBRPD
0
1000000
EBRPD General Fund
50
Drought Preparedness
Use and Reuse Water More Efficiently
Climate Change Response Actions (Adaptation to Climate Change, Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reduce Energy Consumption)
Expand Environmental Stewardship
Practice Integrated Flood Management
Protect Surface and Groundwater Quality
Improve Tribal Water and Natural Resources
Ensure Equitable Distribution of Benefits
Reduce Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Reduce Water Demand
Improved Operational Efficiency and Transfers
Increase Water Supply
Improve Water Quality
Improve Flood Management
Practice Resources Stewardship
Other Strategies (Please Describe)
Groundwater Management Plan
Urban Water Management Plan
Water Meter Requirements
Groundwater Monitoring Requirements
AB 1420 Compliance
BMP Compliance
CEQA Compliance
Water supply reliability, water conservation and water use efficiency
Stormwater capture, storage, clean-up, treatment, and management
Removal of invasive non-native species, the creation and enhancement of wetlands, and the acquisition, protection, and restoration of open space and watershed lands
Non-point source pollution reduction, management and monitoring
Groundwater recharge and management projects
Contaminant and salt removal through reclamation, desalting, and other treatment technologies and conveyance of reclaimed water for distribution to users
Water banking, exchange, reclamation and improvement of water quality
Planning and implementation of multipurpose flood management programs
Watershed protection and management
Drinking water treatment and distribution
Ecosystem and fisheries restoration and protection
Reduced Reliance on the Bay-Delta
Projects that directly address a critical water quality or supply issue in a DAC
Urban water suppliers implementing certain BMPs as on page 17 of Guidelines
Be designed to manage stormwater runoff to reduce flood damage (PRC §5096.827)
Be consistent with the applicable Regional Water Quality Control Plans (Basin Plans) (PRC §5096.827)
Not be a part of the State Plan of Flood Control (SPFC) (PRC §5096.827)

The project will provide and enhance approximately 60 acres of wetlands and 90 acres of coastal prairie will be restored or enhanced.

Project team

Part 3 - Benefits